Tag: richmond virginia

Working with up and coming artists

Posted on June 4th, by Matt Seay in Recording. Comments Off on Working with up and coming artists

 

rosie soul, rock and roll cowboys, rva, music rva, rva local

 

We have been active over here at Full Circle working with all types of new artists and genres. From CNU’s 20 person a cappella group, USounds, to the solo hip-hop mastery of Deadrong, we get an eclectic mix through our doors! One of our recent favorites is a progressive art rock band called “One Truth” hailing from Richmond, VA. One Truth are finishing up their full-length album in our studio and it’s very colorful and diverse in sound! Here’s the video for the single “Inferno” (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RAY8iMy7Kg) , creatively filmed by RVA based Altimira Film Co. (http://altamirafilm.co/)

We are happy to be working alongside some very talented female artists lately. Rosie Soul and the Rock & Roll Cowboys, voted Richmond’s Best Rock Band 3 years in a row , have started recording tracks for their new record at Full Circle. We recently linked up with the award winning, Nashville recording artist Katelyn McCarter and have been working on live music production for her upcoming summer and fall shows.

Recording Guitars: How To Be Prepared

Posted on January 17th, by Matt Seay in Recording. 130 comments
Recording Guitars, Richmond, Studio, Recording

These are the guitars we use in our studio located just outside of Richmond, Va for recording. Welcome to Full Circle Recording!

It’s always best to be as prepared as possible when entering the studio. When it comes to recording guitars and basses, a great amp and a great guitar are ideal but half of the tone really comes from players technique. As in, the way your hands rest on the guitar, the way you hold the pick, and the way you fret and attack the strings all have great influence on your tone. When entering the studio, it is important to be well rehearsed and to have fresh strings on your guitar or bass. It is not unusual for some engineers to request that you change your strings after every hour of playing in the studio. Thicker gauge strings are ideal for lower tunings. When it comes to tuning guitars and bass, it is recommended that one person is responsible for tuning all the instruments with a 1 cent or better accuracy tuner. Check the tuning fretted (usually check around the 5th and then the 12th fret positions) to make sure the instrument is tuned to play in tune. Having open strings in tune doesn’t mean that the instrument will play in tune, especially with lower tunings. The open string usually has to be a bit flat to actually play in tune to compensate for the fretting and strike of the note (again, most often in lower tunings). Make sure to keep the tuner calibrated to 440Hz!